Title

Philippines

College

College of Liberal Arts

Department/Unit

Political Science

Document Type

Book Chapter

Source Title

The Palgrave Handbook of Global Perspectives on Emotional Labor in Public Service

First Page

339

Last Page

360

Publication Date

1-1-2019

Abstract

This chapter examines emotional labor in the Philippines, an archipelagic nation in the Pacific with a population of over 100 million people. A blend of multiple cultures and influences, its contemporary civil service borrows heavily from US public administration and overlays these with traditional and acquired cultural characteristics. Empirical evidence shows that in some ways, emotional labor in the Philippine public sector mirrors that of other countries, but its relationship to job-related outcomes may reflect its own particular culture and context. Emotive capacity relates positively with job satisfaction and personal fulfillment like in many other countries. Emotive pretending while performing one’s job duties has no effect on burnout, unlike in many other countries. Performing authentically—deep acting—has no relationship with job satisfaction and personal fulfillment, but it is positively related to burnout. This is unlike the Philippine private sector, where deep acting was previously found to reduce burnout. Cultural and contextual factors in the Philippine public sector may help to explain these findings. © The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2019.

html

Digitial Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1007/978-3-030-24823-9_15

Disciplines

Work, Economy and Organizations

Keywords

Work—Philippines—Psychological aspects; Acting out (Psychology)

Upload File

wf_no

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS