Title

The necessity of negative affect? The role of rumination in creative writing

Date of Publication

2015

Document Type

Master's Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Psychology Major in Clinical Psychology

Subject Categories

Psychology

College

College of Liberal Arts

Department/Unit

Psychology

Thesis Adviser

Adrianne John R. Galang

Abstract/Summary

The relationship of creativity and depression was found to be correlational rather than causal. The present study examines rumination as a possible underlying cognitive mechanism that links the two, in that rumination, a predisposition to depression, is utilized by writers to achieve their goal. The study also examines the assertion by creative writers that their ability to create stems from negative affect hence, the study examines the role of affect throughout the creative process. In a quasi-experiment involving a sample of 78 undergraduate creative writers, the study found that rumination does lead to improved creative outcomes. However, this effect could not be attributed to self-focused attention. Furthermore, affect does not mediate the rumination-creative outcomes relationship. Successful task completion also does not lead to increased positive affect. However, individuals who experienced greater negative affect prior to revision also experienced greater positive affect after revision, regardless of actual improvement in output. Findings are discussed in light of principles from the control theory of self-regulation, specifically goal abstractedness. Implications of the results for mental health are also discussed.

Abstract Format

html

Language

English

Format

Electronic

Accession Number

CDTG006578

Shelf Location

Archives, The Learning Commons, 12F Henry Sy Sr. Hall

Physical Description

1 computer optical disc ; 4 3/4 in.

Keywords

Rumination (Psychology); Creative writing

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