Title

The role of interpersonal conflict at work, occupational constraints, quantitative workload, and guilt proneness to counterproductive work behavior

Date of Publication

2016

Document Type

Master's Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Psychology Major in Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Subject Categories

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

College

College of Liberal Arts

Department/Unit

Psychology

Thesis Adviser

Maria Guadalupe C. Salanga

Defense Panel Chair

Laurene Chua-Garcia

Defense Panel Member

Homer J. Yabut

Abstract/Summary

The study aimed to investigate the association between various aspects of occupational stress, namely interpersonal conflict at work, occupational constraints, and quantitative workload, and the personalilty trait of guilt proneness, on counterproductive work behavior. Aside from extending the current literature on occupational stressors, personality and counterproductive work behavior, the proponent's inquiry endeavored to study the potential practical applications of concept of the potential guilt proneness in a workplace setting. The final number of participants for the study was five hundred and seventeen (517) working adults. Using opportunity sampling and a regression path analysis, the results corroborated similar findings by other researchers that occupational stress influenced the commission of counterproductive work behavior, and the results also indicated that high levels of guilt proneness negatively relate to the commission of counterproductive work behavior.

Abstract Format

html

Language

English

Format

Electronic

Accession Number

CDTG006532

Shelf Location

Archives, The Learning Commons, 12F Henry Sy Sr. Hall

Physical Description

1 computer optical disc ; 4 3/4 in.

Keywords

Job stress; Work--Psychological aspects

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