Title

Examining social axioms and perceived academic control as antecedents of achievement emotions and academic achievement submitted by: Adonis P. David.

Date of Publication

2013

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Psychology Major in Educational Measurement and Evaluation

College

Br. Andrew Gonzalez FSC College of Education

Department/Unit

Counseling and Educational Psychology

Thesis Adviser

Bernardo, Allan Benedict I., Dr.

Defense Panel Chair

Bustos-Orosa, Ma. Alicia

Defense Panel Member

Garcia, John Addy S. Dr.
Ounao, Jerome A., Dr.
Tarroja, Ma. Caridad H., Dr.
Villavicencio, Felicidad T., Dr.

Abstract/Summary

The present research examined social axioms and perceived academic control as antecedents of achievement emotions and academic achievement among Filipino college students. First, Study 1 tested the hypothesized relation between students’ social axioms and their perceived academic control in mathematics. It examined whether students’ social axioms (social cynicism, social complexity, religiosity, reward for application, and fate control) have direct and interaction effects on students’ perception of control over their academic outcomes in the subject mathematics. Second, Study 2 tested a conceptual model where social axioms serve as antecedents of perceived academic control in mathematics which then serves as a more proximal antecedent of students’ achievement emotions and academic achievement in mathematics. Findings from the two studies provided support to the hypothesis that certain dimensions of general beliefs about the social world may shape domain-specific perceived academic control, which in turn influences students’ test hope, test anxiety, and academic achievement in mathematics. Overall, the findings from the present research highlight the important role of students’ control-related beliefs in shaping their academic outcomes in domain-specific ways.

Abstract Format

html

Format

Electronic

Accession Number

CDTG005633

Shelf Location

Archives, The Learning Commons, 12F Henry Sy Sr. Hall

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